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Oct 31

Written by: CC
10/31/2011 2:03 PM  RssIcon

INTERNATIONAL CHLORINATED PARAFFINS
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INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION
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1250 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. • Suite 700 • Washington, D.C.  20036 • 202-419-1500


Canada Places C10-C20 Chlorinated Alkanes on CEPA Schedule 1

October 2011

 

In the October 12, 2011 Canada Gazette, Environment Canada issued an order placing chloroalkanes C10-C20 on Schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA).  Schedule 1 is often referred to as the “CEPA Toxic” list. The official notice can be viewed at:

http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2011/2011-10-12/html/sor-dors212-eng.html

 

This order is in follow-up to the 2008 proposal from Environment Canada and Health Canada to place C10-C38 chloroalkanes on Schedule 1; however, the final action was revised in light of the recent determination by Health Canada that long-chain chlorinated alkanes/paraffins (also known as LCCPs) do not meet the toxic criteria in CEPA Section 64(c).

 

This final action does not restrict the use of C10-C20 chloroalkanes in Canada; it provides the basis for Environment Canada to issue risk management regulations on this class of chloroalkanes.  There are hundreds of chemicals on CEPA Schedule 1 that continue to be used in a variety of applications.  Environment Canada, in consultation with industry and other stake-holders, develops use regulations for the substances on Schedule 1.

 

For short-chain (C10-C13) chloroalkanes, Environment Canada has already issued a separate proposal to prohibit their use.  This proposed action is not anticipated to impact Canadian industry as C10-C13 chloroalkanes are not currently manufactured in or imported into Canada. 

 

For risk management of the C14-C20 chloroalkanes, which primarily impacts medium-chain chlorinated paraffins (MCCPs), the CP industry intends to work closely with Environment Canada regarding the development of workable risk management rules.  The fact that Environment Canada chose to limit the prohibition of chloroalkanes to just the short-chain (C10-C13) and also did not take any action in this most recent rule to place these substances on the Virtual Elimination (VE) list, which they had originally proposed to do, indicates a good opportunity to work with Environment Canada to develop reasonable risk management rules.

 

ICPIA will continue to coordinating industry efforts regarding the regulation of chlorinated paraffins (chloroalkanes) in Canada.  We will have additional correspondence and possibly a follow-up webinar in the near future. For more information, please contact Andrew Jaques at ajaques@regnet.com or 202-419-1500. 

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